• How did you find out about bulletin boards?

    From nelgin@46:1/194 to All on Mon Mar 25 17:40:03 2024
    My history goes back to about 1981 when I was 10 or so and my school got its first computer. A Video Genie, which is a TRS80 clone, sort of and I was fascinated by it. I got a ZX81 for Christmas and then upgraded to a VIC20.

    At that time I started getting computer magazines and saw ads for online services like Prestel, which was intriguing. I was familiar with Teletext which is a one way data system but this Videotex service promises the ability to send electronic and telex messages, chat with other users, book holidays, conduct finanial business, download software and more.


    I upgraded to a BBC Micro and found that a Prestel information provider (IP) was giving away free modems with subscriptions.

    The Prestel service used to charge 6p per minute during peak times (8am-6pm I think) and then was free other times, except for certain per page charges. That was on top of the monthly subscription.

    That's when I started hearing about other online services, called bulletin boards. Many of them run on similar BBC Micros but with better, auto answer, auto baud modems.

    I was hooked. I was dialing into all sorts of local boards and running up a huge phone bill. Calls, even local calls, were not free and charged per minute and with few exeptions I think that's still the case.

    I ran my own BBS, Modem Mania, for a while in the UK but ended up leaving my parents home, getting a job in another city and really forgot about them for maybe 5+ years unitl I discovered The Internet...and that's a whole 'nother story!
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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@46:1/115 to nelgin on Tue Mar 26 06:21:00 2024
    nelgin wrote to All <=-

    My history goes back to about 1981 when I was 10 or so and my school
    got its first computer. A Video Genie, which is a TRS80 clone, sort of
    and I was fascinated by it. I got a ZX81 for Christmas and then
    upgraded to a VIC20.

    It's a little fuzzy for me, but in 1983 I got a C64. I recall getting
    an Anchor 300 baud modem, but think it was to get onto QuantumLink
    (later AOL). It wasn't until I went to college in the fall that I
    started using my modem to connect to university systems and hearing
    about BBSes. That was about the time we had 2 big computer tabloids
    distributed where I lived - MicroTimes and Computer Currents, and I saw
    the BBS listings in the back.

    In 1986 I got sick of trying to read 80 columns on a 12" black and
    white TV, and got an XT clone and a 1200 baud modem. That's when BBSing
    really took off for me.

    Around 1987, I met Dr. Strangelove, who ran Just Say Yes, and over a
    couple of years got to me his friend and co-sysop. I did most of the
    administrative work on a 2-node Searchlight BBS and got the urge to
    start my own BBS.



    ... Adding on
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  • From nelgin@46:1/194 to poindexter FORTRAN on Tue Mar 26 12:00:34 2024
    Re: Re: How did you find out about bulletin boards?
    By: poindexter FORTRAN to nelgin on Tue Mar 26 2024 06:21:00

    In 1986 I got sick of trying to read 80 columns on a 12" black and
    white TV, and got an XT clone and a 1200 baud modem. That's when BBSing
    really took off for me.

    My first PC was given to me. It was a (c) 1982 Commodore PC with a green screen and 256K of memory and I think a 10mb hard drive or something stupid like that. I could play text adventure games on it and that was about it.

    Around 1987, I met Dr. Strangelove, who ran Just Say Yes, and over a
    couple of years got to me his friend and co-sysop. I did most of the
    administrative work on a 2-node Searchlight BBS and got the urge to
    start my own BBS.

    My first BBS was home grown, I wrote it for the BBC Micro and pretty happy with it, but I ended up buying another BBS product and I wish I could remember what it was called and who it was from, it wasn't one of the mainstream ones at the time. But this one had more stuff than I could code up an was happy with it.
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  • From Nightfox to nelgin on Wed Mar 27 12:54:50 2024
    Re: How did you find out about bulletin boards?
    By: nelgin to All on Mon Mar 25 2024 05:40 pm

    My dad was always into computers, so when I was a kid in the 80s, I often saw my dad using his computer at home.. He had a TRS-80 when I was born (I've only seen it in a photo). Later, he had an all-in-one computer he said he built as a kit computer, and later, he had an IBM PC-compatible along with a couple of Alpha Micro AM1000 computers:
    https://ampm.floodgap.com/www/1000.htm

    I never really knew what he used the AM1000 computers for (he had at least one in another room without a monitor attached), but I saw him use his IBM-compatible PC a lot, working on his own programming projects and dialing into services like CompuServe, Prodigy, etc..

    In 1992, he gave me my own computer, a home-built PC with a 286 processor, along with a 2400 baud modem. He told me about bulletin boards and gave me a list of BBSes, along with a communications program (Procomm Plus). That's when I started using BBSes.. It was during the summer, so I wasn't in school, and I often started dialing into BBSes when my parents went to bed (after around 10:00PM). I thought it was really cool that you could have your computer connect to someone else's computer remotely over the phone line..

    A couple years later, my parents agreed to get a second phone line for my computer that I could use any time and not worry about tying up the main phone line or having my modem answer the phone. I pretty much immediately set up my own BBS, which I enjoyed running, and it also made good use of that phone line.

    Nightfox
  • From fusion@46:1/145 to Nightfox on Wed Mar 27 16:49:18 2024
    on 27 Mar 2024, Nightfox said...

    In 1992, he gave me my own computer, a home-built PC with a 286
    processor, along with a 2400 baud modem. He told me about bulletin
    boards and gave me a list of BBSes, along with a communications program (Procomm Plus). That's when I started using BBSes.. It was during the

    when i was probably in.. 5th grade i think? the teacher for the computer class gave me a 300 baud modem .. that's how i got my start. he wanted me to learn about the internet though, but instead i went and called a bunch of bbses.. worked out in the end anyways but :)

    A couple years later, my parents agreed to get a second phone line for my computer that I could use any time and not worry about tying up the main phone line or having my modem answer the phone. I pretty much
    immediately set up my own BBS, which I enjoyed running, and it also made good use of that phone line.

    lucky.. by the time i had my own second line i was using it for dedicated dialup internet. bit weird having your own phone number at the ISP, but it was cool. i remember injoy dialer for OS/2 had a bunch of extra stuff in it for "professional" use including some stuff to rather aggressively keep it's connection going. i remember i had a backup ISP too .. geez. a bit ocd i guess :)

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  • From Nightfox to fusion on Wed Mar 27 17:18:32 2024
    Re: Re: How did you find out about bulletin boards?
    By: fusion to Nightfox on Wed Mar 27 2024 04:49 pm

    when i was probably in.. 5th grade i think? the teacher for the computer class gave me a 300 baud modem .. that's how i got my start. he wanted me to learn about the internet though, but instead i went and called a bunch of bbses.. worked out in the end anyways but :)

    That's cool :) I'd think 300 baud would have been a bit slow for internet though, even in the mid 90s..

    At the time I started (1992), the internet wasn't widely used yet. I didn't even know about the internet yet, and I'm not sure many people I knew did either.

    lucky.. by the time i had my own second line i was using it for dedicated dialup internet. bit weird having your own phone number at the ISP, but it

    What do you mean by "phone number at the ISP"? Your phone line wasn't at home?

    Nightfox
  • From nelgin@46:1/194 to Nightfox on Thu Mar 28 10:39:18 2024
    Re: How did you find out about bulletin boards?
    By: Nightfox to nelgin on Wed Mar 27 2024 12:54:50

    (after around 10:00PM). I thought it was really cool that you could have your computer connect to someone else's computer remotely over the phone line..

    I think that's what fascinated me about it, too. All that stuff out there you could do over the phone. I wish I had found the internet sooner. I found out about it playing a MUD and was told about Demon Internet, a UK provider that offered dialup with static IP for "10 quid a month". It was a fantasic deal, if you could get into their modems.

    A couple years later, my parents agreed to get a second phone line for my computer that I could use any time and not worry about tying up the main phone line or having my modem answer the phone. I pretty much immediately set up my own BBS, which I enjoyed running, and it also made good use of that phone line.

    Yeah, I had a separate line for my BBS too, but it didn't last long since I moved out of my parents house. I did leave the BBS running for a time but I wanted my computer.
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  • From fusion@46:1/145 to Nightfox on Fri Mar 29 05:22:42 2024
    on 27 Mar 2024, Nightfox said...

    lucky.. by the time i had my own second line i was using it for dedic dialup internet. bit weird having your own phone number at the ISP, b

    What do you mean by "phone number at the ISP"? Your phone line wasn't
    at home?

    what i meant is the number i called.. the line itself was just for me.

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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@46:1/115 to nelgin on Fri Mar 29 06:46:00 2024
    nelgin wrote to Nightfox <=-

    Yeah, I had a separate line for my BBS too, but it didn't last long
    since I moved out of my parents house. I did leave the BBS running for
    a time but I wanted my computer.

    I remember all of those BBSes that opened up with delusions of grandeur
    after christmas, but were only open from 10:00am until 5:00am, using
    their parents' phone line.

    Kinda ruins the mystique of "TH3 HAX0RZ H1DE0UT!!!!1" when mom answers
    the BBS line...



    ... Allow an easement
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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@46:1/115 to All on Fri Mar 29 06:53:00 2024
    I don't know how I got so lucky when I started my BBS. I lived in an
    apartment and just assumed I'd be able to use the outside pair of 4-wire
    telco wire to run the BBS line.

    The apartment building I was in was lath-and-plaster, built in the
    1920s, with old school solid copper 3-conductor cloth-wrapped wire.

    Pacific Bell had a flat rate interior installation charge, I think it
    was $75. The installer must have liked me, because he brought a
    4-conductor telco wire from the DMARC, up through the garbage chute to
    the second floor, stapled up and over 3 doors, the elevator, then back
    down to my apartment, drilled under the baseboard to get through the
    wall, then into the walk-in closet that was my office space.

    Had I known better, or known I would only stay there 2 years, common
    sense might have prevailed. Luckily, I was a dumb kid and the rest is
    history.



    ... Always the first steps
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  • From nelgin@46:1/194 to poindexter FORTRAN on Fri Mar 29 14:01:02 2024
    Re: Re: How did you find out about bulletin boards?
    By: poindexter FORTRAN to nelgin on Fri Mar 29 2024 06:46:00

    I remember all of those BBSes that opened up with delusions of grandeur
    after christmas, but were only open from 10:00am until 5:00am, using
    their parents' phone line.

    Kinda ruins the mystique of "TH3 HAX0RZ H1DE0UT!!!!1" when mom answers
    the BBS line...

    Haha, yup. Another popular method that was used was call, let it ring then call back again. The system would answer if you called within so many seconds.
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  • From nelgin@46:1/194 to poindexter FORTRAN on Fri Mar 29 14:03:36 2024
    Re: Re: How did you find out about bulletin boards?
    By: poindexter FORTRAN to All on Fri Mar 29 2024 06:53:00

    Pacific Bell had a flat rate interior installation charge, I think it
    was $75. The installer must have liked me, because he brought a
    4-conductor telco wire from the DMARC, up through the garbage chute to
    the second floor, stapled up and over 3 doors, the elevator, then back
    down to my apartment, drilled under the baseboard to get through the
    wall, then into the walk-in closet that was my office space.

    Sounds like he went above and beyond. I guess he couldn't just run it up the outside and through a hole in the window frame like they did with my phone install.

    Had I known better, or known I would only stay there 2 years, common
    sense might have prevailed. Luckily, I was a dumb kid and the rest is history.

    What's $75 when you're young and stupid :)
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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@46:1/115 to nelgin on Sat Mar 30 12:09:00 2024
    nelgin wrote to poindexter FORTRAN <=-

    Haha, yup. Another popular method that was used was call, let it ring
    then call back again. The system would answer if you called within so
    many seconds.

    Distinctive ring - I remember a couple of boards that used that and
    Hello Direct sold boxes that could route calls based on the ring. Line
    one would go to your phone, line 2 to the BBS.




    ... Adding on
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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@46:1/115 to nelgin on Sat Mar 30 12:11:00 2024
    nelgin wrote to poindexter FORTRAN <=-

    Sounds like he went above and beyond. I guess he couldn't just run it
    up the outside and through a hole in the window frame like they did
    with my phone install.

    No, this was a beautiful 1930s deco apartment building, 6 floors and 50
    or so units.

    What's $75 when you're young and stupid :)

    I made it up on savings by not having to call LD for files and in
    beersbought for me at BBS gettogethers. :)



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  • From Bob Worm@46:20/111 to Nightfox on Mon Apr 1 21:53:15 2024
    Re: How did you find out about bulletin boards?
    By: Nightfox to nelgin on Wed Mar 27 2024 12:54:50

    Hi, Nightfox.

    In 1992, he gave me my own computer, a home-built PC with a 286 processor, along with a 2400 baud modem. He told me about bulletin boards and gave me a list of BBSes, along with a communications program (Procomm Plus).

    Heha - wow... I had forgotten about Procomm Plus. This is just like my story, except for the bit where you got to play with it and dial into BBSes! In my case my dad brought home a 286 PC and 2400 baud modem from work, along with a list of BBSes a work colleague had given him. I got to watch while he called into a couple and downloaded some dopey EGA paint program but the phone calls cost so much (and I'd have been fairly young at the time) that he never entrusted me with it :)

    BobW
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  • From Bob Worm@46:20/111 to nelgin on Mon Apr 1 21:58:44 2024
    Re: How did you find out about bulletin boards?
    By: nelgin to Nightfox on Thu Mar 28 2024 10:39:18

    Hi, Nelgin.

    was told about Demon Internet, a UK provider
    that offered dialup with static IP for "10 quid a month".

    Oooh, I had definitely not forgotten about Demon Internet but the "tenner a month" slogan had well and truly left my brain! I (or more correctly, my parents) used Demon for a good while - not only a static IP but also a whatever.demon.co.uk subdomain, under which you could use as many e-mail addresses as you liked (in whoever@whatever.demon.co.uk format) and it would kick you SMTP when you came online... A really stand-out offering back in the day.

    BobW
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  • From Nightfox to Bob Worm on Mon Apr 1 14:45:31 2024
    Re: How did you find out about bulletin boards?
    By: Bob Worm to Nightfox on Mon Apr 01 2024 09:53 pm

    In 1992, he gave me my own computer, a home-built PC with a 286 processor,
    along with a 2400 baud modem. He told me about bulletin boards and gave me
    a list of BBSes, along with a communications program (Procomm Plus).

    Heha - wow... I had forgotten about Procomm Plus. This is just like my story, except for the bit where you got to play with it and dial into BBSes! In my case my dad brought home a 286 PC and 2400 baud modem from work, along with a list of BBSes a work colleague had given him. I got to watch while he called into a couple and downloaded some dopey EGA paint program but the phone calls cost so much (and I'd have been fairly young at the time) that he never entrusted me with it :)

    :) Fun times.
    I only called local BBSes, so it didn't add anything to the phone bill. Luckily, there were quite a lot of local BBSes in my area back then.

    Nightfox
  • From Bob Worm@46:20/111 to Nightfox on Tue Apr 2 09:50:41 2024
    Re: How did you find out about bulletin boards?
    By: Nightfox to Bob Worm on Mon Apr 01 2024 14:45:31

    Hi, Nightfox.

    I only called local BBSes, so it didn't add anything to the phone bill. Luckily, there were quite a lot of local BBSes in my area back then.

    Yeah, we didn't have free local calls in the UK... I suppose we still don't, most providers do unlimited calling bundles now but they're nationwide.

    I was lucky enough to be in a town that somehow inherited an area code from the neighbouring capital city, so at least a good chunk of stuff counted as local. I seem to remember there was some not-local-but-not-long-distance setup between London and a few other key cities that I could piggyback onto. It was all by the minute, though :(

    BobW
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  • From nelgin@46:1/194 to Bob Worm on Wed May 1 00:16:31 2024
    Re: How did you find out about bulletin boards?
    By: Bob Worm to nelgin on Mon Apr 01 2024 21:58:44

    Oooh, I had definitely not forgotten about Demon Internet but the "tenner a month" slogan had well and truly left my brain! I (or more correctly, my parents) used Demon for a good while - not only a static IP but also a whatever.demon.co.uk subdomain, under which you could use as many e-mail addresses as you liked (in whoever@whatever.demon.co.uk format) and it would kick you SMTP when you came online... A really stand-out offering back in the day.

    I used their software, WINDIS, I think. I was fascinated watching the SMTP traffic come through when using debug mode, or maybe it did that all the time. Very smart system. I took a tour of Demon Internet while I was down in London for a job interview. Interesting stuff.
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  • From Bob Worm@46:20/111 to nelgin on Wed May 1 14:01:36 2024
    Re: How did you find out about bulletin boards?
    By: nelgin to Bob Worm on Wed May 01 2024 00:16:31

    Hi, nelgin.

    I used their software, WINDIS, I think. I was fascinated watching the SMTP traffic come through when using debug mode, or maybe it did that all the time. Very smart system. I took a tour of Demon Internet while I was down in London for a job interview. Interesting stuff.

    Hmm - I vaguely remember them giving out Turnpike for a while but my recollection is *very* hazy! Soon after I started going online everything began to standardise so you didn't need weird custom stacks any more...

    Was it an interesting tour? Maybe a couple of decades in telecoms has jaded me but possibly the first couple of times seeing a modem rack would be a fun time.

    I once applied for a job at a company making network switches. That was absolutely fascinating because they made their own silicon and pretty much everyone there (I think less than 25 employees total) knew the product inside out. The way they thought about stuff was so different from how I'd ever approached it on the "consumer" side of the deal.

    They did a proper role play in the interview where they played a customer with a problem in their production network and I had to support their product (which I'd never seen). It was a fun way to check whether candidates knew the fundamentals or just what vendor X tells you about their box. I still smile when I remember the guy asking me "is it safe to run that command?" to which I replied "go for it, it's just a lab box", then he came back with "No, this is my production network, remember?" :)

    I remember being in one of Cisco's product awareness training sessions where they were getting all excited about their 1us fixed latency products and I was sat there thinking "they were doing 150ns when I interviewed at that place 3 years ago?!"

    BobW
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  • From nelgin@46:1/194 to Bob Worm on Wed May 1 09:51:58 2024
    Re: How did you find out about bulletin boards?
    By: Bob Worm to nelgin on Wed May 01 2024 14:01:36

    Hmm - I vaguely remember them giving out Turnpike for a while but my recollection is *very* hazy! Soon after I started going online everything began to standardise so you didn't need weird custom stacks any more...

    Not sure about that. Maybe that was after my time. I used Demon for a while in 1994/95 then I switched to Dircon. They seemed to be much after and had really good people. I was going to interview there for a job but I ended up moving to the US.

    Was it an interesting tour? Maybe a couple of decades in telecoms has jaded me but possibly the first couple of times seeing a modem rack would be a fun time.

    I saw cow.demon.net :)

    Pretty neat to think it was a company that started out with 4 modems and leased line internet, if I remember.
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  • From Bob Worm@46:20/111 to nelgin on Wed May 1 19:59:54 2024
    Re: How did you find out about bulletin boards?
    By: nelgin to Bob Worm on Wed May 01 2024 09:51:58

    Hi, nelgin.

    I saw cow.demon.net :)

    Well that just unlocked another memory... Now I'm sat here trying to remember hostnames that I haven't used in 20 years. Oh, wait... carry the one, 1995 was (nearly) 30 years ago now :\

    Random aside, I used to work in a place that rented colo space (among other things) and always remember finding a customer who had set all their reverse DNS to <musician>.<company>.com. They had done a very good job of coming up with a list of top-flight names, starting at A and progressing through the alphabet until they hit the end of their IP block. When I branched out on my own I bought my business cards from them :)

    BobW
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  • From nelgin@46:1/194 to Bob Worm on Wed May 1 19:11:27 2024
    Re: How did you find out about bulletin boards?
    By: Bob Worm to nelgin on Wed May 01 2024 19:59:54

    I saw cow.demon.net :)

    Well that just unlocked another memory... Now I'm sat here trying to remember hostnames that I haven't used in 20 years. Oh, wait... carry the one, 1995 was (nearly) 30 years ago now :\

    I remember when the internet would slow down when the US woke up. They had a T1 , I think, to the US which was fine while nobody was using it. Usenet was a great way to get files and ftpmail too.

    Random aside, I used to work in a place that rented colo space (among other things) and always remember finding a customer who had set all their reverse DNS to <musician>.<company>.com. They had done a very good job of coming up with a list of top-flight names, starting at A and progressing through the alphabet until they hit the end of their IP block. When I branched out on my own I bought my business cards from them :)

    I named my servers after drinks; gin, vodka, whiskey, tuaca... :)
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  • From Infiltrator@46:1/104 to Bob Worm on Wed May 29 18:55:05 2024
    Back in 1988 my parents bought a full Commodore 128 setup used. Not sure on the sellers situation, but in addition to the usual it included extra floppy drive and a 300 baud modem. I did not have money to pay for the various services that were offered. However, there was a weekly/monthly computer publication that had all the state (MN) BBS numbers. I was hooked.

    From there I needed to find a way to access long distance numbers without using codes. I heard and witnessed horror stories of people getting caught. My goal was to find other ways and test phone systems, 800 dial up modem and exchanges to exploit flaws to get long distance for free.

    Throughout this journey of wardialing and exploiting were modem and system upgrades. A very exciting time in my youth and lead me to the career I am in today.

    -Infiltrator

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  • From Floris van Unen@46:2/115 to nelgin on Thu May 30 08:07:12 2024

    Hello nelgin!

    Replying to a msg dated 25 Mar 24 17:40, from you to all.

    i was in secondary school where we were taught information technology, and i bought a written off 286AT from my dad's work. I joined a computerclub in town which was sponsored by a PC shop which also had a BBS. So i borrowed a modem and dialed in. Then later became a point in the Technet 111: FTN as many other computerclub members did. Then i left all that, moved and went to Technical College, got my B.Sc. and over the last 25 years been working on large-scale websites ever since. Just a month ago started to find my interest in FTN again.

    regards,
    Floris


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  • From akacastor@46:20/106 to Infiltrator on Sat Jun 1 23:24:37 2024
    From there I needed to find a way to access long distance numbers
    without using codes. I heard and witnessed horror stories of people getting caught. My goal was to find other ways and test phone systems, 800 dial up modem and exchanges to exploit flaws to get long distance
    for free.

    Throughout this journey of wardialing and exploiting were modem and
    system upgrades. A very exciting time in my youth and lead me to the career I am in today.

    In the 90s I also wished for a way to access long distance numbers, I was too nervous to try much myself, and a lot of the text files I was reading probably didn't apply to systems near me.

    I'd love to hear any stories or memories you have of wardialing and everything that goes along with it!


    "Would you like to play a game?" :)


    Chris/akacastor

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  • From akacastor@46:20/106 to akacastor on Sat Jun 1 23:34:39 2024
    "Would you like to play a game?" :)

    "SHALL WE PLAY A GAME?" is the correct quote!

    I even googled it and "would you like to play a game" showed so many WarGames references that I thought that confirmed it. Nope!


    Chris/akacastor

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  • From Tiny@46:1/700 to AKACASTOR on Sun Jun 2 07:39:00 2024
    akacastor was heard saying....

    I'd love to hear any stories or memories you have of wardialing and everything that goes along with it!

    I didn't have to wardial. There was a couple access codes that got floated around for long distance services. I used one of those for over a year with the same code to call New York to connect to a free service that offered
    slip access to the internet.



    Shawn

    ... It's so true to life it's hardly true.
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  • From akacastor@46:20/106 to Tiny on Sun Jun 2 19:22:31 2024
    I'd love to hear any stories or memories you have of wardialing and everything that goes along with it!

    I didn't have to wardial. There was a couple access codes that got floated around for long distance services. I used one of those for over
    a year with the same code to call New York to connect to a free service that offered slip access to the internet.

    That sounds awesome - over a year is pretty good longevity. Being used for access to the internet I assume it was pretty heavily used? Did you ever hear of any consequences from the access codes, or did they just stop working one day and everyone moved onto something else? If the codes were floated around I guess you wouldn't have been the only one enjoying them.

    I think the closest I got was calling a BBS with a 1-800 toll free number and using it to trade files with a long distance friend. Eventually the sysop messaged us and told us to ease off a bit as us staying connected too long was going to become a problem when the beancounters noticed it.


    Chris/akacastor

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  • From Infiltrator@46:1/166 to akacastor on Mon Jun 3 00:22:26 2024
    Thanks for your interest. I am guessing a lot of the text files you read probably covered boxing, using various tones. The other risky ones were the "950" numbers basically prepaid calling cards and other similar phone cards.

    Thinking back of the ways to achieve long distance was to:

    Dial the discovered 800 numbers and using any outbound modem connections they offered. These numbers were mostly Universities.

    Calling anything that had a PBX and wait when the receiver would disconnect you might get a dial tone on that system.

    When on a system with outbound modems sending a Hayes AT command "a/" would send/show the last modem command sent. This would often result in undiscovered numbers/BBSs and even other places.

    I really enjoyed coming back from school and having new numbers to dial as my wardialer was sending the output to my printer.

    There were a lot of systems that I fumble my way to use. Goal was never to be destructive but use it to learn.


    -Infiltrator

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  • From Tiny@46:1/700 to AKACASTOR on Mon Jun 3 06:14:00 2024
    Quoting Akacastor to Tiny <=-

    That sounds awesome - over a year is pretty good longevity. Being
    used for access to the internet I assume it was pretty heavily used?

    I know my friend and I used it a /lot/.

    Did you ever hear of any consequences from the access codes, or did
    they just stop working one day and everyone moved onto something else?

    They just stopped working one day. From waht I remember now it was a
    Toronto number which was long distance to me. So I would use my calling service which gave me unlimited access to Toronto for $10 a month then
    connect to it, enter another code and dial new york. LOL

    The dialing string was something else. :) ATDT9055551212,,,,,123456789,,4165551234,,,,123456789,,,,,2125554321
    Soemthing like that. Dial the local number, enter a code, dial the
    Toronto number enter a code dial the new york number.

    If the codes were floated around I guess you wouldn't have been the
    only one enjoying them.

    Must have been a ton of people using that one. I wasn't really in the
    "scene" so by the time it hit boards I called...

    Shawn

    ... There's nothing moister. Than an oyster!
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